Memorial

We honor the men who have served the Orangeburg County Sheriff's Office and paid the ultimate price to provide law enforcement services to the citizens of this county. Annually in May during Police Officers Memorial week, we pay tribute to the line of duty deaths as well as the men who have passed away while employees of the Orangeburg County Sheriff's Office. Well served police officers, may you rest in peace. We will never forget your sacrifice.

There have been four officers who have lost their lives while on tour at the Orangeburg County Sheriff's Office.

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OCSO Fallen Officers

End of Watch: May 3, 2008

Corporal William Howell was shot and killed while responding to a domestic disturbance. Corporal Howell was approaching the home to assist the female victim remove belongings when the male subject opened fire with a shotgun, striking him in the neck. The suspect, who was out of jail on bond on a charge of assault and battery with intent to kill, was then run over and killed by his wife as he attempted to leave the home.

Corporal Howell had served with the Orangeburg County Sheriff's Office for three years and had served in law enforcement for a total of 16 years, having served as a jailer at the Berkeley County Detention Center from 1993 to 2000, with the Moncks Corner Police Department, the South Carolina Department of Corrections, the Dorchester County Sheriff's Office and as an officer with the Jamestown Police before taking a position with the Orangeburg County Sheriff's Office.

CorporalHowell is survived by his wife and four sons.

William Howell, Jr.'s name has been engraved at the National Law Enforcement Memorial in Washington, DC. His name can be located on panel 20, E-26.

End of Watch: April 12, 1999

Corporal Tommy Prezzy was killed after losing control of his patrol car and running off the road. The vehicle flipped several times and he was ejected from the vehicle.

Corporal Prezzy had served with the agency for 9 years.

Tommy Prezzy's name has been engraved at the National Law Enforcement Memorial in Washington, DC. His name can be located on panel 32, E-21.

End of Watch: June 6, 1965

Deputy Myers was shot and killed by a man he stopped for speeding. The suspect was arrested a short time later in Berkeley County. It was discovered that the suspect had been hit five times by Deputy Myers' return fire.

The suspect was convicted of first degree murder and sentenced to death. The state supreme court overruled the verdict and ordered a new trial. He was convicted of manslaughter April 23, 1969.

Deputy Myers had served with the agency for 2 years and was survived by his wife and three children.

Roy Myers' name has been engraved at the National Law Enforcement Memorial in Washington, DC. His name can be located on panel 19, E-12.

A plaque bearing Roy Myers' name is displayed at the South Carolina Law Enforcement Officers Hall of Fame in Columbia.

End of Watch: January 20, 1944

Deputy Sheriff Gary Fairey was shot and fatally wounded while attempting to serve a warrant on a man at his home in Branchville.

The man was granted permission to get his hat, but instead he grabbed a gun and opened fire. Deputy Fairey was shot through the chest but was able to return fire and killed the suspect. Deputy Fairey died at the county hospital four days later.